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Sunday, November 16, 2008

Holy Cross, Batman

Dan takes a look at the legacy of sports programs at his alma mater, Holy Cross. This is prompted by today's ceremony in which HC finally raises the numbers of its 1950s star players to the rafters. He takes a look at some of these players like Cousy, Heinsohn, and Togo Palazzi. He also examines the tension at HC between the focus on academics and the focus on sports. Academics is king but there have been recent movements (such as today's ceremony) to at least recognize the rich legacy of the sports teams. It is a good read.

6 comments:

roger bournival said...

It's difficult for young folks to grasp the magnitude of the deeds of these ballplayers.

Now get off my lawn!

Anonymous said...

I think Shank should be a permanent fixture on the college beat. It will keep him away from the sports people really care about.

Anonymous said...

OB,

Off the Holy Cross subject - did you catch following:

"Here’s a head-turning headline you won’t see in The Boston Globe: The venerable broadsheet told its unions it was losing close to $1 million a week as recently as this summer."

Full article at Boston Business Journal:

http://www.bizjournals.com/boston/stories/2008/11/10/daily40.html


Guess Shank will join the minions pretty soon at the local pub to reminisce about the good ole days.

g

mike_b1 said...

A good read? Really?

It was his semiannual suckup to his alma mater. So Holy Cross had some good basketball players back in the days when Andrew Jackson was president. Big deal.

mike_b1 said...

Hey CHB, when you read this tonight, don't forget what you wrote in March 2007"

"Then there's Dustin Pedroia. Any chance the kid is in over his head?"

http://www.boston.com/sports/baseball/redsox/articles/2007/03/28/its_hard_to_get_a_clear_crisp_picture/

Anonymous said...

Ya, I wouldn't hold your breath waiting for Shank to admit he was wrong about Pedroia. Remember he said David Ortiz was "a giant sack of you know what (shit)" after the Sox acquired him, 5 years and two world series championships later I haven't heard him admit he was wrong.